Soldier's Guide to Field Music
Volume II


By Kim Newell


Think of music and the calls as a foreign language. You don't have to learn the whole language, just these certain phrases. Also, when recruiting, remember to recruit MUSICIANS; it's imperative they have interest, as well as physical and mental maturity and ability.


CALLS YOU'LL HEAR IN CAMP:

REMEMBER—THERE ARE ONLY FIVE DRUM-ONLY CALLS THAT YOU'LL HEAR IN CAMP:
WOOD CALL:
"Go Foooooorrrrr The Wood"
WATER CALL:
"Drip Drip Drop"
FIRST SERGEANT:
"Fiiiiirrrrrrrssssst Ser-geants Call" (One Roll, Three Flams)
ALL NCOs:
"Rrrrrolllllll Rrrrrollllllll All N - C - Os Call" (Two Rolls, Five Flams)
ADJUTANT:
"The Bear Jumped Over the Can."
PIONEER'S CALL:
All you Pioneers go and chop wood today.
All you Pioneers go and chop wood.
All you Pioneers go and chop wood today.
All you Pioneers go and chop wood.
Go chop wood.
Go chop wood.
It is time to go and chop wood.
Go chop wood.
Go chop wood.
It is time to go and chop wood.
ROAST BEEF: (Provisions Call, Dinner Call, Usually used for Nooning As Well)
These are ORIGINAL 18th CENTURY LYRICS by WILLIAM CHAPPELL:

When mighty roast beef was the Englishman's food,
It ennobled our hearts, and enrich-ed our blood;
Our soldiers were brave and our courtiers were good
Oh the roast beef of old England!
And oh, for old England's Roast Beef!
ROGUE'S MARCH: (Used to march undesirables out of camp, etc.)
This tune sounds very taunting:

Fifty cents I paid for my shirt
Fifty I paid for my blanket.
If I ever enlist in the Army again,
The devil will be my sergeant.

FORMATION:

FACINGS:
"To the right,"    Bam!    "Face!"    Flam!
"To the left,"    Bam! Bam!    "Face!"    Flam!
"To the right about,"    Bam! Bam! Bam!    "Face!"    Flam!
"To the left about,"    Bam! Bam! Bam! Bam!    "Face!"    Flam!
WHEELS:
"To the right wheel,"    Rrrolll! Bam!    "March!"    Flam!
"To the left wheel,"    Rrrolll! Bam! Bam!    "March!"    Flam!
"To the right about wheel,"    Rrrolll! Bam! Bam! Bam!    "March!"    Flam!
"To the left about wheel,"    Rrrolll! Bam! Bam! Bam! Bam!    "March!"    Flam!
DOUBLINGS: (Safety Inspections/Open Ranks)
Doubling Ranks for Safety's Sake
Wonder how long this is going to take.
These inspections last too long
Out here in the sun.
Here's my sergeant, ramrod in hand
As some park staff trails behind.
Search your pieces they demand;
Who knows what they might find.

Note: You might recognize this piece as "Country Dances," a commonly played tune characterized by the drums clicking sticks when played on the march.

ON THE FIELD:

ALARM
This call is most obvious from the long drum roll. In camp, this is used as an assembly if it's a surprise attack. On the field, this will be used to stop action because there is an emergency. DRUM ROLL=STOP ACTION/EMERGENCY
ROSALINE CASTLE/MOURN MUSKETS
This tune is in a minor key, which means it sounds sad. This will be played at the end of battles to signify for the "dead" to rise. SOLDIERS SHOULD MOURN MUSKETS.

ON THE MARCH:

Musicians post to the right of their companies, dressing on the front rank.

COMMON STEP: 75 Beats/Minute
QUICK STEP/MARCH MARCH: 120 Beats/Minute

Copyright © 1998 Kim Newell. All rights reserved.